Volume 8, Issue 2, December 2020, Page: 43-51
pH-Thermosensitive Oral Hydrogels Containing Phenobarbital for a Potiential Pediatric Use
Alphonse Rodrigue Djiboune, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal; National Center for Scientific Research, Bioactive Molecule Design and Application Laboratory, Joint Research Unit 7199, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Nicolas Anton, National Center for Scientific Research, Bioactive Molecule Design and Application Laboratory, Joint Research Unit 7199, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Sidy Mouhamed Dieng, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal; National Center for Scientific Research, Bioactive Molecule Design and Application Laboratory, Joint Research Unit 7199, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; Galenic and Industrial Pharmacy Laboratory, Healthy UFR of Thies, University of Thies, Thies, Senegal
Papa Mady Sy, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal; National Center for Scientific Research, Bioactive Molecule Design and Application Laboratory, Joint Research Unit 7199, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Louis Augustin Diaga Diouf, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal
Gora Mbaye, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal
Mamadou Soumboundou, Biophysics Laboratory, Healthy UFR of Thies, University of Thies, Thies, Senegal
Nadia Messaddeq, Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Institute of Health and Medical Research U1258, National Center for Scientific Research, Joint Research Unit 71104, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Said Ennahar, Multidisciplinary Institute Hubert Curien, Multidisciplinary Institute Hubert Curien-Department of Analytical Sciences, National Center for Scientific Research, Joint Research Unit 7178, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Thierry François Vandamme, National Center for Scientific Research, Bioactive Molecule Design and Application Laboratory, Joint Research Unit 7199, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Mounibe Diarra, Physical Pharmaceutic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal
Received: Sep. 22, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 10, 2020;       Published: Oct. 16, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejb.20200802.15      View  10      Downloads  16
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to develop a pH-thermosensitive oral chitosan-based hydrogels, able to release phenobarbital in the small intestine of the newborn. Phenobarbital is an active drug used in neonatal treatment of epilepsy. pH-thermosensitive hydrogels will improve its bioavailability and therapeutic efficiency with less side effects. This study allowed us to understand the free energy variation at the interface between chitosan chains themselves and the surrounding available molecules with its interactions behavour. Indeed, inverted tube method was used to prepare hydrogels containing 2.45 and 2.55% of chitosan, eudragitE100 and phenobarbital at 37+/-1°C via sol-gel transition. The characterization of their morphology was done by using XL SIRION 200 FEG SEM. In addition, conductivity, refractive index and density’s values were determinated. The phenobarbital release mechanism from hydrogels at different pH values, simulating the gastrointestinal tract of the newborn was also studed. UV / visible spectrophotometer SHIMADZU from the UV-2400PC series was used to determine the phenobarbital released amount as a function of time. The results showed that sol-gel transition time decreases when the chitosan concentration increases. In addition, it showed that the hydrogels structure was heterogeneous and the phenobarbital released amount were more important at pH simulating the small intestine at 2.45% of chitosan, final solution’s pH6.85 and with the presence of eudragitE100. These results were confirmed by conductivity’s values. The sols and hydrogels had a comparable refractive index and density’s values. The Korsmeyer-Peppas model was used to fit the phenobarbital release profiles. In short, the hydrogels formulated lend themselves to a phenobarbital pulsatile release usable in the newborn. The phenobarbital release profiles fitting makes possible to predict the phenobarbital amounts, which will be released at the action sites according to the need.
Keywords
pH-Thermosensitive, Oral Hydrogels, Phenobarbital, Pediatrics, Pulsatile Release
To cite this article
Alphonse Rodrigue Djiboune, Nicolas Anton, Sidy Mouhamed Dieng, Papa Mady Sy, Louis Augustin Diaga Diouf, Gora Mbaye, Mamadou Soumboundou, Nadia Messaddeq, Said Ennahar, Thierry François Vandamme, Mounibe Diarra, pH-Thermosensitive Oral Hydrogels Containing Phenobarbital for a Potiential Pediatric Use, European Journal of Biophysics. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 43-51. doi: 10.11648/j.ejb.20200802.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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